100 Mile March: A Running Goal

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It’s true, the feeling that you get when you run, especially when you run well, is unmatched. It’s a combination of strength and fulfillment that are difficult to explain, but are immediately recognizable once you’ve felt them.

With that being said, the idea that every run changes you couldn’t be more accurate, which is why Paige and I are taking on the challenge: to run 100 miles in the month of March.

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We’ve started simple, with four mile intervals which would put us well beyond our goal if we run every day. But that’s where taking on the task is much larger than just a run. Like the quote above, every run changes you. Yes, fitness and health are great motivators, but the consistency and dedication that are necessary to reach 100 miles in that time provide the groundwork for the change that all distance running instills.

Who knows what our next race will be, there are options all over the city year-round, and stepping outside the comfort of runDisney might not be a terrible thing. But I guess we’ll see where the challenge goes, and before you know it, we’ll have 100 miles down and we’ll be working on the next goal.

If you want to connect with us, and others participating, connect on Twitter with #FFMarchMiles led by FitFluential.

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Which Wearable: A FitTech Poll

There are a ton of options out there in wearable technology, and that number is growing exponentially by the day. Aside from the fun things like Google Glass, FitTech is exploding too; from major brands with Nike+ to upcoming debuts like OMsignal, there are a ton of options out there.

That being said, the team at Third Wave Fashion wants to know which FitTech you’re using! Head over and take the poll on their blog and weigh in with your favorite device.

Find the Poll Here!
Find the Poll Here!

Airport Assault: Road Racing at WCU

Airport Assault Road Course
Airport Assault Road Course

In a college town that consists of little more than an expanding campus and a run-of-the-mill athletic department, it’s easy to overlook the absolutely excellent events that take place.

Outside of the Valley of the Lilies Half-Marathon and 5k, and when Western alum Manteo Mitchell pulled in Olympic Silver at the London Games, there hasn’t been a ton to be proud of in terms of athletic achievement. Luckily, and thanks to a dedicated group of collegiate cyclists, Western is now set to host a three-part race weekend on Saturday and Sunday March 22 and 23.

Though I wasn’t a part of the riding community, to see this group put together a complete race experience is nothing short of exciting. It’s easy to get lost in the valley that houses Cullowhee, to forget that there are people that want to come and experience the mountains. The nine percent grade of the time trial route may not be the way most people expect to experience Cullowhee, but then again active communities like cyclists don’t always fit into the “most people” category anyway.

The races are open to collegiate riders, with registration online at USA Cycling. These races include the one mile time trial mentioned before, an 18-63 mile road race, and a 20-50 minute criterium. Distances and times will be determined by rider category, which include Collegiate M-A,B,C,D and W-A,B. Each race costs $15 to pre-register, and $18 for day-of registration.

An awards ceremony will take place on Sunday after the criterium, which should not only highlight the weekend’s top racers, but also the little-known hospitality that so many people in the WCU community are full of. With the introduction of the Airport Assault race weekend, I’m proud to say I graduated from Western, and can’t wait to see what this does for the cycling team, the university and the community as a whole.

For more information take a look at the official WCU Cycling Team page and learn more about the excellent people that are making this event happen.

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Connected Runners: Basno Digital Medals

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“Why do you run?”

That question alone is a pet peeve that nearly every runner faces on a constant basis. There are runners all over the world, from occasional joggers to elite runners that can run five minute miles for incredible distances, but the one thing they all have in common is the simple fact that they get out and do it; regardless of reason.

For many though, whether running is therapeutic or just another step toward a healthier lifestyle, there is little more that is as satisfying as a finisher’s medal at the end of the race that you trained months for. Despite blisters and lost toenails, heatstroke and hypothermia, the feeling you get as the medal is placed around your neck is unmatched.

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Unfortunately, the moment is typically short lived when it comes to sharing with friends and family. Newsfeeds fill with pictures of lunches and vacations, and within a day or two the moment disappears and the evidence of accomplishment is tucked away in a forgotten album labeled “Big Race ’13” or simply “Running.”

Luckily for the connected runners out there, Basno has developed race badges to harness the spirit of running and to share the passion for the sport that every runner has.

With digital personalization, times and names can be added to the finishing badge that every runner receives, offering a new way to connect the community and invite others in. Being in the midst of an emphasis on social engagement, the badges make it easier for runners to share their experiences and curate an online showcase of their accomplishments.

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Personally, I’m excited about the ability to store my accomplishments digitally in one place, especially considering that now just two months into 2014, I’ve already got seven finisher medals and no good way to display them online.

Ultimately, the running community is a strong one; a massive group of people that love being active and inviting outsiders to join them. In the digital world, I’m not sure what more could be done to bring such an offline community online than a way to join peers in accomplishments that nobody outside the community could ever understand.

So to answer the question of why we run, it’s because we’re runners. It’s what we do.

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Team USA: Uniform of Tradition

Olympic sweater

There is no doubt that to participate in the olympics is an honor unlike any other.

Countless athletes have done their best to describe the feeling of representing your country, what it’s like to hear your nation’s anthem ring through the stadium or arena, all because for a frozen moment in time you were the best, your country, was the best.

Unfortunately though, that’s a feeling that many of us probably won’t experience. We won’t feel the pressure of a global audience, we won’t feel the weight of an expectant nation on our shoulders, looking to us to prove the strength and resilience of our country despite such an unstable world.

No, the international stage of the Olympic Games is reserved for an elite few, but luckily, there is one thing that we can share.

Tradition.

No matter who you are, what you believe, or where you live; tradition is one thing that we can all value. From family farms to generations of cops and fire fighters, tradition is one thing that may ring more true than the freedom we so proudly boast.

It’s with tradition in mind that I’ve come to appreciate what Ralph Lauren is doing with the 2014 Sochi Olympic uniforms. I wasn’t a fan of the Polo logo skillfully emblazoned on each garment, but understanding the story and the lengths the company went to to develop a truly American uniform is something that we can all appreciate.

From Oregon to New York, North Carolina to California, the details of the process pay homage to the traditions that have built this great nation.

Journalists Reportedly Banned From Smartphone Photography At Olympics In Russia

Considering our use of Instagram and Tumblr for the 2012 Political Conventions, maybe it’s a good thing we didn’t get the Olympic credentials we applied for.

With the ability to spread such incredible photos, like those referenced in the article, I’m curious as to why Russian officials wouldn’t want to capitalize on the free press of so many international guests potentially awe-struck by the Sochi scenic views.

Maybe R-Sports should just suck it up, get an Instagram account and run a brilliant tagging campaign rather than spitting in the face of the future we’re living in. Do I think the move will hold up? No, but I am curious to hear what you think.